Basics Series: Connecting Rods

by | Jul 2014 | 3 comments

Aluminum in tension tends to move or distort a bit more than steel resulting in a loss of radial bearing crush (all that normally retains a bearing in its bore). Aluminum rods use a dowel pin to locate and secure the lower (non-load) rod bearing so ...

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Torque Benders, Part 1: Differential Basics

Torque Benders, Part 1: Differential Basics

With RWD, you’re making all that horsepower up front, but you’ve got to make it do a 90-degree turn to spin those tires. That’s got to be hard on the mechanism — downright brutal in any kind of racing. Here’s how to get started putting the pieces back together, and a set-up shortcut, too.

read more
CC Rider, Part 1

CC Rider, Part 1

What we’re talking about here is a bunch of “C” words — cubic centimeters, combustion chambers, compression, and calculation.

read more

3 Comments

  1. ericred

    Excellent article…sure makes you think about that “little 283′ that you spun to 6 grand at every shift ..all weekend long!! and the others when you “ventilated” the block!

    Nice work
    Eric T

  2. MASTERMECH48

    Liked the picture of the “walk to shore” [as we called them in the Navy] conn rod.

  3. msparkm74

    excellent – the rod bolt stretch data was particularly interesting, as my 1974 Pontiac Super Duty used that method, and I always was curious as to the real advantages. (It also used an 80 psi oil pump, but that’s another set of questions) Nice descriptions that are understandable with good backup photos.

    Regards,

    Mark A. Meyer

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Torque Benders, Part 1: Differential Basics

Torque Benders, Part 1: Differential Basics

With RWD, you’re making all that horsepower up front, but you’ve got to make it do a 90-degree turn to spin those tires. That’s got to be hard on the mechanism — downright brutal in any kind of racing. Here’s how to get started putting the pieces back together, and a set-up shortcut, too.

read more
CC Rider, Part 1

CC Rider, Part 1

What we’re talking about here is a bunch of “C” words — cubic centimeters, combustion chambers, compression, and calculation.

read more

3 Comments

  1. ericred

    Excellent article…sure makes you think about that “little 283′ that you spun to 6 grand at every shift ..all weekend long!! and the others when you “ventilated” the block!

    Nice work
    Eric T

  2. MASTERMECH48

    Liked the picture of the “walk to shore” [as we called them in the Navy] conn rod.

  3. msparkm74

    excellent – the rod bolt stretch data was particularly interesting, as my 1974 Pontiac Super Duty used that method, and I always was curious as to the real advantages. (It also used an 80 psi oil pump, but that’s another set of questions) Nice descriptions that are understandable with good backup photos.

    Regards,

    Mark A. Meyer

Submit a Comment